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Route 66 News

Exploring the old Bridgeport alignment of Route 66

Rich Dinkela shot this video of him trying to access both sides of an old bridge in Bridgeport, Okla., that once spanned the South Canadian River and carried Route 66 until the mid-1930s. The bridge is long-gone; the only thing left are the bridge supports.

4 thoughts on “Exploring the old Bridgeport alignment of Route 66

  1. Rick Martin

    We have made it to the north side a couple of times. There is some of the cable partially covered up on the north side of the road but you can still find part of it. Just to the west of the piers is a railroad bridge that is no longer in service. The rail line that connects to it is now used to store unused rail cars. It is worth the little extra effort to visit the rail bridge if you go out there. One note to add: That area along the river seems to be popular with locals for target practice so you may hear gun shots. Don’t think it is dangerous, but don’t want you to be alarmed if you hear gun fire.

  2. xy47402

    The railroad line was built by the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway, called the “Rock Island” line. It was part of their “Choctaw Route” which originated in Memphis, TN, and ended at Tucumcari, NM, where trains were handed off to the Southern Pacific Railroad. In the heyday of rail travel, it was possible to board the Rock Island’s transcontinental, deluxe train, named “The Golden State Limited,” at Chicago LaSalle Street station, and ride all the way to Los Angeles Union Station. You train would have used Bridgeport Bridge. While not as famous or glamorous as the Sante Fe “Superchief,” The “Golden State” was comfortable and had a character.

    1. Bob Bostwick

      The main carrier, east and west, through Oklahoma was the Rock Island, with extensive facilities in El Reno, some 20 miles east of Bridgeport. I don’t know if it was mentioned in the video, but the owners charged a $1 toll on that bridge, representing some serious price gouging for those days.

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