All 116 episodes of the “Route 66” TV drama from the 1960s are on YouTube

A few episodes of the famed “Route 66” television drama from the early 1960s had been posted online in dribs and drabs over the years.

However, earlier this summer, The OTR Collection uploaded all 116 episodes of the drama that starred George Maharis and Martin Milner. The entire playlist is below, starting with the first episode, “Blac,k November”:

The “Route 66” drama became of the key moments of pop culture that cemented the real Route 66 highway in the public consciousness. (Ironically, “Route 66” seldom ever shot episodes on Route 66.) Milner, who portrayed Tod Stiles, and Maharis, who portrayed Buz Murdock, were a couple of restless chums who traveled the country in a Chevrolet Corvette convertible, looking for odd jobs and adventure. 

“Route 66” was unusual in that it shot in a different location every week, providing a real-life glimpse of America to viewers decades later.

The show also proved to be a training ground for young directors and up-and-coming actors, the latter including James Caan, James Coburn, William Shatner, Robert Duvall, Jack Lord, Cloris Leachman, Lee Marvin, Walter Matthau, Martin Sheen and many others.

“Route 66” sported top-notch scripts, many by head writer Stirling Silliphant, that delved into social issues that portended the upheaval of the late 1960s.

Milner died in 2015. Maharis, at last report, still is around at 93 years old. (You can our interview with him in the early days of Route 66 News.) Glenn Corbett, Maharis’ replacement in the latter days of the show, died in 1993 at age 59.

(Hat tip to Paul Greeley; publicity image of Martin Milner with co-star George Maharis on the set of “Route 66”)

2 thoughts on “All 116 episodes of the “Route 66” TV drama from the 1960s are on YouTube

  1. Terrific! Just watched the first and last episodes. And in spite of the marginal writing, they are such a perfect time capsule of growing up in that era.

  2. I was lucky enough to have seen this marvelous program when it first aired in the 1960s, and have caught up with it again and again when it’s been shown in syndication or on YouTube. Now I’m following all 116 episodes on OTR’s YouTube channel, and as with any classic, it offers something different with every viewing. (One thing hasn’t changed in 60 years – my adoration of George Maharis!) It’s wonderful that a new audience will get to experience one of the greatest television shows of all time.

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